Instant orange peel.

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DeCaff2007

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re read my previous post, buzz it with a piece of 80 grit to get the gummy stuff gone.get down to what ever coat is not wrinkled up and switch up to 180g then go 220 if it suits you. Ideally you are going to need to re-prime it anyway. It all depends on what wrinkled on how far you have to go.

Rushing paint work usually doesn't work out. You have to pay attention to flash times , temps and do it accordingly. Piling paint on prevents the last coat from releasing solvents. You can create solvent pop, a gummy surface etc. Not hard to create the problems you're trying to avoid by being in a hurry.

I tried that, too. What that did was cut right past the paint and started digging into the fiberglass. Good thing I did it lightly, in an inconspicuous spot.

I appreciate the advice and all the attempts at help, I really do. I've also learned I'm not cut out for body work. It's going to my FIL's first chance I get.
 

alignman88

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The set up that has wrecked many (potential) autobody tech careers before they ever really got started.


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Truth! The hours spent wet sanding are a heck of a character builder. In that bucket is the wisdom of 1,000 men. It’s like the trials of Job in the biblical story sense LOL. It is the master professor of teaching patients and the value of doing all the little things very well.
 

RichLo

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I've also learned I'm not cut out for body work. It's going to my FIL's first chance I get.

Yep... Just Yep.

Been there, in that position. I know just enough about paint and body work to know that if I want something done right I'm not the one to do it. If I want 'Good enough' I can usually put out better than expected work but I always keep my expectations at a minimum
 

DeCaff2007

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Yep... Just Yep.

Been there, in that position. I know just enough about paint and body work to know that if I want something done right I'm not the one to do it. If I want 'Good enough' I can usually put out better than expected work but I always keep my expectations at a minimum

Understood. I mean, I can weld well enough (that's part of bodywork, is it not?) that, with a little practice, I could get certified.

Paint, however, it's a patient mans game.
 

Erik the Awful

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I hope I'm not hijacking here, but asking for a way forward for myself and DeCaff2007.

I just read through this entire thread, and it raises some concerns for me. I just welded the rear window frame into Roscoe, and I shot it with some Rustoleum primer with the intention of shooting some black Rustoleum over the top. This is a work truck, so I don't mind patina, but I don't want it looking hokey. I haven't planned on a professional paint job, but I also know that Rustoleum fades terribly. This is just part of my "get it driveable" strategy.

The problem is that I need to get the rear window in it, and I need the paint laid down before installation. Do I just go with Rustoleum for now and if I ever decide it looks hokey, tape off the rear window and sand and paint the rest?

I'm not a professional paint guy, and I don't have the time to do a full paint job on the truck right now. If I were going full-bore on the bodywork, there's a lot more I'd need to do. Until then, is there a cheap, easy to use paint and primer system that I should use instead of Rustoleum?
 

Hipster

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I hope I'm not hijacking here, but asking for a way forward for myself and DeCaff2007.

I just read through this entire thread, and it raises some concerns for me. I just welded the rear window frame into Roscoe, and I shot it with some Rustoleum primer with the intention of shooting some black Rustoleum over the top. This is a work truck, so I don't mind patina, but I don't want it looking hokey. I haven't planned on a professional paint job, but I also know that Rustoleum fades terribly. This is just part of my "get it driveable" strategy.

The problem is that I need to get the rear window in it, and I need the paint laid down before installation. Do I just go with Rustoleum for now and if I ever decide it looks hokey, tape off the rear window and sand and paint the rest?

I'm not a professional paint guy, and I don't have the time to do a full paint job on the truck right now. If I were going full-bore on the bodywork, there's a lot more I'd need to do. Until then, is there a cheap, easy to use paint and primer system that I should use instead of Rustoleum?
My take on this, if it's urethane set glass, if nowhere else, I would want quality 2k products under the urethane so the window doesn't come loose and start leaking. Rustoleum or any othe kind of 1k spray can stuff is not what I would do here. 2k products can be had in a spray can from a paint jobber. A can of 2k epoxy or some other type of direct to metal primer and a little activated single stage. I would say you could do urethane directly over epoxy prime but most epoxies are not UV stable either. All the prep/sanding needs to be very thorough where the glass goes.
 
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Erik the Awful

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So does this look like a decent strategy for painting the window trim?

Sand back down to bare metal.
Prime it. www.amazon.com/SprayMax-Activated-EPOXY-Primer-3680034/dp/B07CXPQ814/
Smooth it because my welding sucks. www.amazon.com/SprayMax-3684026-Polyester-Filler-Primer/dp/B08142BHQK/
Paint it. www.amazon.com/SprayMax-3680222-Topcoat-Black-Gloss/dp/B0897987KG/
Clear coat it. www.amazon.com/Spray-Refinishing-Permanent-Surfaces-3680061/dp/B0043B7UQY/

That's about $120 versus $40 in Rustoeum primer and paint, but if it keeps me from losing the rear window once, it's worth it. Is SprayMax a decent rattle can urethane?
 

TechNova

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I hope I'm not hijacking here, but asking for a way forward for myself and DeCaff2007.

I just read through this entire thread, and it raises some concerns for me. I just welded the rear window frame into Roscoe, and I shot it with some Rustoleum primer with the intention of shooting some black Rustoleum over the top. This is a work truck, so I don't mind patina, but I don't want it looking hokey. I haven't planned on a professional paint job, but I also know that Rustoleum fades terribly. This is just part of my "get it driveable" strategy.

The problem is that I need to get the rear window in it, and I need the paint laid down before installation. Do I just go with Rustoleum for now and if I ever decide it looks hokey, tape off the rear window and sand and paint the rest?

I'm not a professional paint guy, and I don't have the time to do a full paint job on the truck right now. If I were going full-bore on the bodywork, there's a lot more I'd need to do. Until then, is there a cheap, easy to use paint and primer system that I should use instead of Rustoleum?
The industry standard is to only put urethane over OEM paint or 2 part epoxy primer. Not epoxy surfacer, only epoxy primer. Any other coating can be the weak link causing the urethane not to adhere to the body. Using any coating other than OEM or epoxy primer is a decision you have to make understanding that the strength will be less.
 

Erik the Awful

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So, prime it with the epoxy primer I linked to above. Tape off the actual window mounting surface, proceed with smoothing, painting, and clear coating the rest, then pull the tape and have the window installed right on the epoxy primer?
 
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