EGR help

Discussion in 'Engine Performance + Maintenance' started by Michael Hild, Jan 18, 2020.

Car Parts
  1. Michael Hild

    Michael Hild Newbie

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    To be clear this was my first engine swap. I generally wouldn’t have done something like this on my own but I had driven the truck 900 miles to deliver my exes possessions and the other engine threw a rod and burned a valve so I went with what I though would be cheaper and found an engine a guy had for sale out of his 78 corvette. I couldn’t tell you what engine was in my truck to start with bc the block castings were all mauled up. Judging from the head casting it was a mid to early 80s pickup. The reason I asked about the egr is I only have basic knowledge on the egrs function and the only intake I could find that was affordable did not have the egr mounts and I’ve seen where people have had their trucks programmed to run without it. I had planned to do the same but I need a quick fix to get me home so I can work on fixing it the right way.
     
  2. Michael Hild

    Michael Hild Newbie

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    The knock sensor I’ve got hanging right now bc I need a new one. How it was functioning in the condition it’s in is beyond me. But out of curiosity (and this is bc I’m not around it to look right now) would there be a spot for the knock sensor in this older block?
     
  3. Schurkey

    Schurkey I'm Awesome

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    As I said...you'd pull out the plug in the block drain hole, and screw the knock sensor right in. Ideally, you'd use a wire brush to scrape the rust out of the block threads, and some pipe-thread sealant if the new knock sensor didn't have some already applied.

    Typically, it's the block drain on the right side of the block--just ahead of the starter.

    Usually, a long-handled 3/8 ratchet and some harsh language takes them right out. The block drain plugs can sometimes be tough to remove--they're iron or steel, and they rust in place. They're typically hex-head, 9/16. Use a six-point socket, not 12 point. If the plug is stuck in the block, heat the PLUG with a torch so that it glows. (Propane is not hot enough. I'm thinking oxy-acetylene.) Let it cool. Screw it out. Once out, there can be a crust of hardened sediment behind the plug. Knock out the crust of sediment. Best to pop out all the core-plugs, and then haul the block to a car-wash and blast the water jacket with high-pressure warm (or hot) water.

    As long as you're doing all this, pull the other drain plug, too. Either re-install with a quality pipe-thread sealer, or install a brass plug--or a brass draincock with some pipe-thread sealer. The brass won't seize in the iron block.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2020
  4. Michael Hild

    Michael Hild Newbie

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    Ok there was just one on the other block but I’m pretty sure it broke pulling it out so it needs replaced. It hasn’t been a very bad swap so far just some odds and ends need buttoned up.
     

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