My first suspension rebuild, have questions

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Erik the Awful

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For the most part, I don't worry so much about grease. The same spec grease can come in many different colors. The different types may not have the same qualities, but in my experience they don't conflict. Finally, the parts that require grease aren't terribly picky about what type, but just require enough grease to lubricate them. I'd run it and not worry.

But...

I'm not a chemical engineer, just a dude who's done an utter crapload of wheel bearings and chassis lubrication in his career. Due diligence is to read the specs on both greases.
 

Kens1990K2500

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For the most part, I don't worry so much about grease. The same spec grease can come in many different colors. The different types may not have the same qualities, but in my experience they don't conflict. Finally, the parts that require grease aren't terribly picky about what type, but just require enough grease to lubricate them. I'd run it and not worry.

But...

I'm not a chemical engineer, just a dude who's done an utter crapload of wheel bearings and chassis lubrication in his career. Due diligence is to read the specs on both greases.
I called Mevotech's tech support again, and spoke with a different person, who gave me a bit more information regarding grease. He said they use a "semi synthetic, nanoceramic grease" and said it is litihium based.

I did an Internet search on nanoceramic grease, which I'd never heard of before, and search results mainly point to one product, DayLube "nanoceramic racing grease," manufactured by Dayton Progress Corp. of North Carolina. According to a person I spoke to who is a distributor of that product, that particular grease (DayLube) is tan in color, so I may have found the grease that Mevotech uses. I've never seen any tan-colored grease before. In any case, both the guy at Mevotech, and the grease distributor, seemed to believe it should be okay to use a lithium-base grease with it (the red grease sold at my local auto parts store is lithium complex grease).

I don't know if flushing the existing grease out is an option; I imagine that would take some time, and the joint would have to be greased repeatedly over a short period of time. I am considering ordering some of the DayLube grease, but at $50 a tube, it isn't cheap. Leave it to Mevotech to use an oddball grease. Despite going down a rabbit hole on this matter, I'm still no closer to a definitive decision. Like you and others have said, I may just say 'screw it' and use the common red grease. It sucks to be OCD sometimes.
 

Kens1990K2500

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At least I resolved the cotter pin issue. Tech support at Mevotech said I should use the smaller of the two cotter pins supplied, for a nut that is below the hole. Besides being slightly smaller diameter wire, the hook portion of the pin is offset.

I included a photo of it installed. Looks a bit funky, but is secure.
 

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Schurkey

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If the castle nut is too low to intercept the cotter pin, in my driveway it'd get a spacer/washer to boost the nut to proper height...

...AFTER I was sure that the male taper in the stud is compatible with the female taper on the part it's secured into.

This is not something I'd leave to a fancy spring-pin.



Grease compatibility:
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and/or

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And there's a dozen more charts for those who choose to research this.
 

Schurkey

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Getting the links in was a pain; I ended up putting the bolt up through the lower control arm, because it was easier to deal with a bolt head, rather than nut and washer, through the hole in the lower control arm. I could have used about a half inch more thread on the bolt, but I got the nut on.
I bet that's why you're short on clearance to the upper control arm.

I just started the bolts for the sway bar clamps (I had to undo the clamps in order to wrestle with getting the end links assembled). Is it correct to wait until tires are back on the truck, and tires are back on the ground (full weight on front suspension) before I tighten the sway bar brackets? Also, these are rubber bushings; I've read poly bushings should get silicone lube to prevent squeaks, but should rubber bushings go on dry?
Rubber bushings would be dry, and can probably be torqued in any position since the rubber isn't bonded like the rubber in a control arm bushing.

Next, I noticed that the end link bolts are very close to hitting the upper control arm. Will this correct itself once the bar brackets are tightened?
Pretty sure you're going to have to turn that bolt the other direction. But I'm too lazy to look in the service manual.

Another thing I noticed was that although the front suspension is hanging, the upper control arms are not resting on the metal bracket (there is no jack under the LCA). What is keeping the UCA from resting on the metal bracket? I thought it was supposed to, when the vehicle is up in the air.
Shock absorber at the limit of it's travel?
 

Kens1990K2500

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I bet that's why you're short on clearance to the upper control arm.


Rubber bushings would be dry, and can probably be torqued in any position since the rubber isn't bonded like the rubber in a control arm bushing.


Pretty sure you're going to have to turn that bolt the other direction. But I'm too lazy to look in the service manual.


Shock absorber at the limit of it's travel?
Okay, so I was trying to take the cheap/easy way out on the end links. You are absolutely correct, the factory manual shows the bolt head on top. It is a real test of patience trying to juggle a bushing, washer and nut through a tiny hole in the bottom of the lower control arm, even moreso since the bolt goes through at an angle and doesn't line up with the hole.

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SO ... I went to my local auto parts chain and bought the Moog end link kits. I removed the cheap end links and compared them to the Moog kit. The Moog kit is much better. You can insert the bushing, washer and nut in one 'piece' through the lower control arm, so I was able to install them with the bolt on top. The instruction also say to tighten them with the tires on the ground. Although I only have the links and bushing brackets snugged up, the clearance between the link bolt and upper control arm looks much better.

(By the way, O'Reilly charged $29 each for the link kit. I could have gotten them on Rockauto for $12 each, but I am anxious to get the truck back on the road.)
 

Kens1990K2500

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If the castle nut is too low to intercept the cotter pin, in my driveway it'd get a spacer/washer to boost the nut to proper height...

...AFTER I was sure that the male taper in the stud is compatible with the female taper on the part it's secured into.

This is not something I'd leave to a fancy spring-pin.
You're right, that spring pin does bother me a bit. So if I have to remove the nut to add washers or a spacer, I will need to remove the tie rod stud from the female taper, since I am technically loosening the nut?

And what is the correct tool to remove a tie rod end without damaging the boot? I know enough not to use a 'pickle fork' to separate parts I want to re-use, but I don't know the best tool to use to not damage the part.


Grease compatibility:
You must be registered for see images attach


You must be registered for see images attach


and/or

You must be registered for see images attach


And there's a dozen more charts for those who choose to research this.
I'm aware of grease compatibility charts, but none of them mention "nano-ceramic" grease. The one company that manufactures DAYlube (Dayton Lamina) even changed their formula. Their container used to state "nanoceramic racing grease," and the grease was white, but their newer formulation, which is tan grease, no longer contains ceramic, and the packaging states "high performance grease." (I spoke to Dayton reps yesterday.) Although their grease is tan, I don't know if it's the actual grease that Mevotech uses.

This is driving me crazy (and you all probably think I'm crazy), but I'm going to call Mevotech again and ask for the actual brand/manufacturer of the grease they use on their parts. I'd really like to use the exact same grease, because I don't like the idea of mixing greases.
 

Caman96

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I put Mevotech TTX upper/lower ball joints, TTX inner/outer tie rods, TTX end links, idler/bracket, pitman……. all got Red’N’Tacky pumped in with install last spring. With a few greasing’s, it’s all red grease coming out. I have zero concern of them all failing because I changed the grease.
 
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