'97 K1500 Suburban (JB6) Rear Brake Line Selection

Disclaimer: Links on this page pointing to Amazon, eBay and other sites may include affiliate code. If you click them and make a purchase, we may earn a small commission.

Pinger

I'm Awesome
Joined
Mar 10, 2020
Messages
3,091
Reaction score
6,129
Location
Scotland.
Really doesn't look like it to me. Everything seems dry on both sides of the problem area.
The area you are describing as the leak point was where the external corrosion was on mine identified by the tester (MOT - annual safety inspection). Possible that it was a GM replacement but as my 'Burb has been this side of the Atlantic since 1999, more likely the original factory fit pipe. Remarkably long lasting then - and if the same on yours, possibly the flexible hose is too. A good time to replace it? If so, bear in mind you will be disturbing the rear section of the rearward (1/4'') pipe. If the fitting there gets awkward - well you'll be working your way toward the front in short order!
 

df2x4

4L60E Destroyer
Staff member
Super Moderator
Joined
Mar 1, 2012
Messages
11,303
Reaction score
13,069
Location
Missouri
Remarkably long lasting then - and if the same on yours, possibly the flexible hose is too. A good time to replace it?

That's the plan. As I mentioned at the end of the first post I have a set of Russell braided soft lines ready to go that will be installed.

If so, bear in mind you will be disturbing the rear section of the rearward (1/4'') pipe. If the fitting there gets awkward - well you'll be working your way toward the front in short order!

This is the main reason I'm leaning towards ordering the entire 14 piece hard line kit from Inline Tube at the moment. At least that way if I end up needing more than I bargained for it'll be on hand.
 

Caman96

OEM Baby!
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 17, 2020
Messages
7,715
Reaction score
15,026
Location
The Hub
Seems hard to believe “another” line failed in the same area and this one being SS(not sure if prior line was SS) failed from corrosion. I’m leaning towards rubbing caused failure. I’ve had SS on for close to 4 years up here in North East and last time I checked looked as if new.
 

Pinger

I'm Awesome
Joined
Mar 10, 2020
Messages
3,091
Reaction score
6,129
Location
Scotland.
That's the plan. As I mentioned at the end of the first post I have a set of Russell braided soft lines ready to go that will be installed.
Apologies - missed that bit.
This is the main reason I'm leaning towards ordering the entire 14 piece hard line kit from Inline Tube at the moment. At least that way if I end up needing more than I bargained for it'll be on hand.
If you order the entire kit then you'd be as well fit it. That way, the only fittings of concern are at the MC and the wheel cylinders - less troublesome than the unions connecting the pipe sections which are now dispensable. If, replacing the MC - front lines at the same time?

Where I found my pipes to be particularly corrosion susceptible was the rear most 1/4'' pipe leading to the flexible and, where the (front and rear) pipes turn through 90 degrees at the front exiting the engine bay. If corrosion is becoming your issue, check those areas. What you find there may influence your decisions.
 

Road Trip

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2023
Messages
1,352
Reaction score
3,865
Location
Syracuse, NY
If there are any other good options I'm missing please let me know.

I've done way more brake line replacement than I ever wanted to. But
that is the way when you prefer to drive old while living in the rust belt.

So take the following with the tons of salt that they use around here over the winter. (New York Salt Shed)

****

Based upon hard won firsthand experience, NiCopp has become my ultimate reference when installing new brake lines
for friends and family. (ie: the people I care most about. :0) Purportedly lasts longer than stainless, yet easier to get
leak-free flares than when I used to work with OE original steel lines. (And way easier than working with stainless.)

Here's a link where I discuss NiCopp in a bit more detail: (NiCopp testamonial)

And here's where I link to a (currently $36) OTC brake flaring tool that gives me
solid results with straight steel, and flawless results with NiCopp: (flaring tool reply)

****

For me the bottom line is that every NiCopp installation I've done has gone on to outlast the vehicle it was installed in.
It gives you the longevity of stainless with the ability to be flared by mere mortals. If I was helping someone in NM or AZ
on a finite budget, I guess I could be talked into using a spool of the OE steel stuff in order to make a safe system.

But everywhere else the only solution I'll help implement is based on a spool of NiCopp. NOTE: Of course prebent SS
is a more than acceptable solution, but I offer the above as food for thought for those reading this who either simply
can't fit a prebent SS solution into their home budget or they are fixing a DD (that protects their GMT400 from the salt season)
that nobody offers prebent lines for.

FWIW --

* Optional Reading *

I found this thread over in the garagejournal website interesting, particularly reply #13. This helped to explain
why everyone I asked said that upgrading to SS was pretty close to impossible with normal flaring tools. (SS work-hardens)
 
Last edited:

Caman96

OEM Baby!
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 17, 2020
Messages
7,715
Reaction score
15,026
Location
The Hub
My vote is for the full In Line Tube SS kit. Many don’t like the SS saying they leak, but you need to tighten and loosen them at least 3 times. I kinda successively tighten more each time and they have to be TIGHT! For me, pre-bent is just easier.
 

Road Trip

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2023
Messages
1,352
Reaction score
3,865
Location
Syracuse, NY
If the leak is between the axle tube and the line, you can bet it is a rub through. Need to make sure that wherever there is the stand off bend tabs, run the line there and bend to hold.

I've also seen lines fail prematurely due to a 'chafe' between the line & where it was routed. I've had
mixed results with pre-bent lines -- almost always I've had to finesse the prebent into a better fit during
installation?

BTW, @Caman96's pointer in reply #16 to the SS gravel-guard spring looks to be a 'belt and suspenders' level fix for
any lines that are exposed to possible damage from debris that's kicked up by the tires. Slide some of that over
the NiCopp line would be both chafe & FOD resistant -- a better than new fix for those that think that way.

And if you think about how that axle dances around (especially on rough roads) it's easy to see how a chafe
condition would show up there, but at the same time nowhere else on the vehicle.

Great conversation about all things having to do with brake lines. And this is the time of year to proactively
inspect/correct any cheesy lines -- about 10x less painful to do now then having it fail and getting to lay in
slush to fix the same thing. Ask me how I know. :0)

Sincerely,

Summa *** laude graduate of the School of Hard Knocks

:)
 

df2x4

4L60E Destroyer
Staff member
Super Moderator
Joined
Mar 1, 2012
Messages
11,303
Reaction score
13,069
Location
Missouri
The inline tube does come with the protective springs. They are pretty nice.

I just emailed them to clarify if the rear axle lines in the complete 14 piece kit come with the protective springs like the stand-alone rear lines do. I would assume they do, but I can't tell from the picture.

You bought the complete kit right?
 
Top