Is this stuff ok to use on ICM

Disclaimer: Links on this page pointing to Amazon, eBay and other sites may include affiliate code. If you click them and make a purchase, we may earn a small commission.

L31MaxExpress

I'm Awesome
Joined
Apr 21, 2018
Messages
6,455
Reaction score
8,723
Location
DFW, TX
Make your own wiring! You can always start with wiring that’s avail for performance module upgrades. Regarding location - anywhere is better than the lava bed it sits on now.
I have relocated several of them. Usually to a finned computer fan heat sink on an inner fender, with a square cutout of the inner fender so that the cooling fins are out of the engine compartment. On the large cap HEIs with mechanical advance, it was a module delete using a MSD 6a box. When I actually ran a vehicle with the older HEI, I kept a spare module, spare cap with a coil in it, spare rotor and the condenser harness in a box under the back seat. It never made it more than a year without needing one of those items in the Texas heat. Something would end up cooking in the summer heat.
 

udidwht

I'm Awesome
Joined
Jan 25, 2021
Messages
223
Reaction score
141
Location
Renton Highlands,HB Ca.,Fujieda-Japan
i remember reading some computer nerd thing where they would apply it with a rubber roller or a credit card. thin thin thin. i usually put a thin coat on with my finger
Gneral rule is more is NOT better. You only need a pea sized amount to spread across the surface. The Artic stuff will usually come with a plastic spreader to smooth it out after applying a pea sized amount at the center.
 

BeeTrap

Newbie
Joined
Oct 27, 2022
Messages
2
Reaction score
3
Location
Flora, MS
Has anyone even tried adding a heat sink underneath the plate on the distributor. Even if the paste is absolutely perfect for drawing away heat, there is no place for the heat to "go". Just curious. Relocation sounds better. I have had a ICM let me down, multimeter proved the failure. So when I replaced it I did "spread" the compound thin, but still had reservations that this white goo was actually working!!!
 

tayto

I'm Awesome
Joined
Nov 11, 2020
Messages
803
Reaction score
852
Location
Canada
Has anyone even tried adding a heat sink underneath the plate on the distributor. Even if the paste is absolutely perfect for drawing away heat, there is no place for the heat to "go". Just curious. Relocation sounds better. I have had a ICM let me down, multimeter proved the failure. So when I replaced it I did "spread" the compound thin, but still had reservations that this white goo was actually working!!!
years ago i remote mounted my ICM on my TBI caprice. Made a heat sink out of a 1/2" chunk of aluminum. even cut fins in it with a skill saw. Turned out good. had to get shielded wire that was rated for underhood temperatures. took a old ICM and gutted it and used it as a junction block to hook up the pickup coil wires. it worked, but the car didn't see much use so I can't comment if it was more reliable or not.
 

Supercharged111

Truly Awesome
Joined
Aug 20, 2015
Messages
13,068
Reaction score
16,304
Refresh my memory, but aren't these ICMs already mounted on an aluminum heatsink? My LT1 Camaro has one. *KNOCK ON WOOD* I haven't lost an ICM since before I left home in 2004 so I really don't see a need to reinvent the wheel.
 

L31MaxExpress

I'm Awesome
Joined
Apr 21, 2018
Messages
6,455
Reaction score
8,723
Location
DFW, TX
Has anyone even tried adding a heat sink underneath the plate on the distributor. Even if the paste is absolutely perfect for drawing away heat, there is no place for the heat to "go". Just curious. Relocation sounds better. I have had a ICM let me down, multimeter proved the failure. So when I replaced it I did "spread" the compound thin, but still had reservations that this white goo was actually working!!!
The thermal paste does work well, provided it is not attached to something that is 200+ degrees.
 

thinger2

I'm Awesome
Joined
Jul 6, 2019
Messages
1,638
Reaction score
4,150
Location
Tacoma
I don't see ignition modules as being particularly picky about which heat-sink compound is used...as long as SOMETHING is used, and it isn't wheel-bearing grease.

There was a time when plain ol' silicone dielectric grease was suggested. I think we can do better now, but in a pinch...


Details, please. My Fluke 88 comes apart about twice a year to fix dim or non-functioning LCD segments. I've been rubbing the contacts with a plain ol' pencil eraser to clean them. It works for awhile.

You must be registered for see images attach
My fluke 87 loses a segment every couple of years but my old fluke 27 fm doesnt.
The pencil eraser trick works just fine. But because all of Western Washington is a high humidity environment and because I sometimes use it in a saltwater environment, I used a very very thin coat of silver based anti corrosive contact compound on it the last time it happened.
A friend of mine has the same meter and he used No-ox and that also worked.
Just a very very thin coating seems to do the job
 

thinger2

I'm Awesome
Joined
Jul 6, 2019
Messages
1,638
Reaction score
4,150
Location
Tacoma
I don't see ignition modules as being particularly picky about which heat-sink compound is used...as long as SOMETHING is used, and it isn't wheel-bearing grease.

There was a time when plain ol' silicone dielectric grease was suggested. I think we can do better now, but in a pinch...


Details, please. My Fluke 88 comes apart about twice a year to fix dim or non-functioning LCD segments. I've been rubbing the contacts with a plain ol' pencil eraser to clean them. It works for awhile.

You must be registered for see images attach
I thought I had replied to you but I cant find it.
My fluke 87 looses segments about every 2 or 3 years or so and I use the pencil eraser fix too.
My military issue Fluke 27fm doesnt have that problem
My reason for using a silver based anti corrosive gel on my fluke is a twofold theory.
All of Western Washington is a hostile environmemt for electronics
Saltwater marine use is a bit beyond the design parameters for that 87 meter.
So I used silver anti corrosive on the 87
And I dont take it on boat trips anymore.
It has a lot of options and features that I will never use on a 12volt 120 gen boat.
My military issue fluke 27/fm is a brick.
Its about the size of a brick too.
If you see a 27/FM for sale
Not just a 27. It needs to be a 27/Fm
Buy it.
They dont have all of the features of the 87 88 range but the 27 is a durable rock solid field use brick.
They are getting to be hard to find.
You should try to find one while you can.
 
Top