Led headlights

Discussion in 'Audio + Electronics' started by 001pewter, May 10, 2019.

  1. df2x4

    df2x4 Domestics only.

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    I don't have a lot of hope for those Morimotos in the low beams. If they do work I'd say it's more of a credit to the Bosch E-code housings than the LEDs themselves.

    As a general rule, match the housing with the type of bulb it was designed for.
     
  2. Trigger_guard

    Trigger_guard Newbie

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    I've seen and run dozens of these led flood lights. They suck to look at but they're not too bad, as long as your wired the low beam up right. (only half the diodes burning). Honesty that's all you'll need too. Probably forget where your dimmer switch is.

    If you want something with actual lenses I recommend these.
    https://ebay.us/fpwo1M
    I run these in my peterbilt
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2019
  3. 001pewter

    001pewter Newbie

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    Thanks for the suggestion, I may run these awhile or may not. Haven't really decided yet. When I do I'm gonna go with the lmc and bring it back to more of a factory look. These may end up behind the grille like a light bar or in a bumper.
     
  4. Viru

    Viru Newbie

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    I have not, but I believe I have a fair idea of the counterarguments at play.

    Since the technology is readily available, there is a huge range of products - a lot of which are indeed inadequate. However, if you leverage key optical concepts, and find a bulb that replicates the light output of a filament bulb as closely as possible, you're in good hands.

    There is no inherent incompatibility between LEDs and Filament Housings/Lenses - it's simply a matter of producing an appropriate output, and you can retain your factory beam pattern while improving your luminous flux and color temperature.
     
  5. df2x4

    df2x4 Domestics only.

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    Those statements contradict themselves. The fact is that no drop in LED replacement will produce an identical beam pattern to a halogen in a reflector designed for a halogen. All you need to do is look at them to make that connection. Halogens emit light almost perfectly equally 360 degrees around the filament. Nearly every drop in LED on the market has two sets of diodes, set 180 degrees offset from each other. Even if you can clock the LED in the housing, the diodes don't emit light equally throughout their 180 degree spread. There are hot spots and weak spots.

    Sometimes you'll find a specific halogen reflector that seems to play really well with a drop in LED, but most of the housings available for these trucks are not in that category from what I've seen. Even then, what seems like "appropriate output" to the naked eye will often be wildly inappropriate if actually tested with the equipment that OEMs use when building their lighting solutions. The true science behind it is admittedly over my head, but I would encourage anyone looking for further info to check out www.candlepowerforums.com.
     
    98chevy2500SS and 94burbk1500 like this.
  6. sewlow

    sewlow Bitchin' Stitchin'

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    Also, look at how LEDs sit within the housing. Compared to an incandescent, LEDs are a lot further forward. They sit too far away from the reflector which is the cause of a poor beam pattern. That further forward placement is not opitimizing the reflector in the manner it was designed for.
     
  7. s98gmc

    s98gmc Newbie

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    I often think people go for a drive after installing new lights and feel like it's a huge upgrade because the road is really well lighted. But they're not considering the amount of glare, and may not realize that 100 feet down the road is no better than before. I've seen some of these "upgrades" while out driving. Poorly aimed and/or blinding amounts of glare. I think one of the worst offenders I've seen was a Jeep with dual spot lights in addition to headlights.

    My GMC had terrible lighting too. New housings (Spyder) and upgraded wiring made a lot of difference with the original bulbs.
     
    98chevy2500SS and df2x4 like this.

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